Why Canada’s Next Masterpiece Might Be 3-D Printed

duane-linklater-salt-pot-2015-1000

duane-linklater-salt-pot-2015-1000

By Leah Sandals | Canadian Art

There were a few surprises this morning when some new grants for 3-D printing were announced in Toronto.

The first Be3Dimensional Innovation Fund grants have gone to prominent, internationally acclaimed Canadian artists who are primarily known for analog, rather than digital, works: Geoffrey Farmer of Vancouver and Duane Linklater of North Bay.

Through the grant, both Farmer and Linklater will be able to access a $100,000 fund to create new works at Think2Thing, a privately owned 3-D printing atelier in downtown Toronto that was co-founded by photographer Edward Burtynsky.

Linklater—who is Omaskêko Cree and actually already did a small 3-D printing project in 2015 at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, creating copies there of eight “unauthored” First Nations artifacts—says he is attracted to the possibilities 3-D printing technology has in relation to repatriation of First Nations objects that are currently in museum collections.

Continue reading on Canadian Art.